Yearbook Vocabulary


Cutlines
DPS
External Margins
Font
Gutter
Internal Margins
Network
Pica
Point
Server
Signature
Template
Trimlines




Cutlines - Trimlines

The edge of the page that is created when the paper of the signature is physically trimmed with a precise blade



DPS

Double Page Spread - The two facing pages you see when you open a yearbook. The DPS always starts on an even number, with the exception of "Page-One" which must always be a "half DPS". Likewise, the very last page in the book is an even numbered "half DPS".



External Margins

The margins around the "outside" of a DPS, between the content of the page, and the cutlines - typically there are 3 picas at the top of a page, 2 on either side, and 4 at the bottom.



Font

The shape and style of the alphanumeric characters. Our standard text font is "Lynn" which is a close knock-off of "Times New Roman". Typically, we will use only a total of 2 or 3 different Fonts in any edition of the yearbook to preserve a professional look. The fonts are chosen very deliberately so that they will complement each other using principles of typography. The Fonts are enforced in our templates by using the STYLE palette.



Gutter

The crease down the middle of a DPS where the book is folded



Internal Margins

The standard margins between any "objects" on your page - typically one pica in size



Pica

The professional standard unit of measurement for most Desktop Publishers. A pica is 1/6 of an inch, and is a comfortable size for internal margins. All objects on a page should be sized so that they are "even pica" - ie. "25 pica" rather than "25.14 pica"



Point

A the smallest professional standard unit of measurement for most Desktop Publishers. A point is 1/12 of a Pica, or 1/72 of an inch. Font heights are typically presented in points (ie. a newspaper uses 10pt characters in it's articles)




Servers - Network
To make it easier to collaborate on yearbook page production, we store files and pages on specific SERVERS in the school NETWORK of computers.
Network.jpg
A NETWORK is a collection of individual computers that are connected together, typically by a wire called an ETHERNET cable. This allows files to be easily viewed or moved from one computer to another.

A SERVER is a computer whose harddrive is made available to other computers on the network. Instead of only being able to store files on your LOCAL computer's harddrive, you can also store and retrieve files from any SERVERS you have been given access to.

SERVERS are typically stand alone computers that aren't used for anything except serving files - they are also typically designated to serve files for specific uses or groups of users.